Friday, January 31, 2020

Using Semiprecious stones & Crystals for Pets



Using Semiprecious stones & Crystals for Pets
jeanie mossa MS. L.Ac.
copyright jeanie mossa 2018


Crystals and gemstones have been used since ancient times for healing, medicinal purposes and spiritual practices as well as adornment. Gemstones and crystals are said to help heal emotions, calm the mind and reduce stress for people and animals.

I personally have a few crystals on my nightstand to help me sleep. I have started to incorporated them in my veterinary acupuncture practice. When treating dog or cat patients, I place crystals in the treatment room and close to them. I have found that It helps keep the atmosphere calm – and they add a lovely decorative touch.

You can find crystals and gemstones in their natural state, looking like geodes or crystals or tumbled into smooth stones. Either form will work. You may also find them on jewelry for people and pets.


You can place crystals or gemstones on a collar, cage, under the pet’s bed or in its crate. Make sure the stones are not in a place your pet will eat or swallow them. Please note crystals and gemstones are not a replacement for veterinary care.

There are hundreds of different types of crystals and stones. These are a few that I use in my practice:

Rose Quartz –  A lovely pink stone. Known as the Love stone. Aids in unconditional love and bonding. Helps your pet to accept love and companionship. Reduces stress. Helps pets adjust to new situations and homes. A must for Rescues and abused animals.

Hematite –  A silver grey stone. A grounding protective stone which absorbs negative energy, stress and worry. Its magnetic effect helps new pets and owners bond. Aids in blood disorders and the muscular system.

Tiger’s Eye – A gorgeous brown and golden stone. A grounding stone used for protection, especially when traveling. Good for endurance and agility. It is said to have an overall pain-relieving effect.

Amethyst – A purple stone. One of the best healing and calming stone used to reduce stress, anxiety, rattled nerves and disorientation. Great for Rescues and couch potato pets. Improves low energy. Clears negative energy. Aids in reducing pain.

Turquoise –  Named after its color, turquoise blue or green. Known as the Master Healer of Stones. Revered by the Native Americans. Used for protection from being stolen, straying or accidents and animal haters. Also for pets with arthritis. Said to have anti-inflammatory and detoxifying effect.

Black Lava  – Looks like black lava! Used for protection. A very grounding stone giving the pet a sense of stability during change.
You may find black lava as a bead to use with essential oils.Place a drop of an essential oil on the bead. Wait a few minutes for the oil to absorb into the bead before putting it on, to avoid the oil making contact with your dog’s skin.  Lavender oil is used for a calming effect. Do not give this to your pet internally!


Lapis Lazuli – A dark blue stone sometimes with white stripes or specks. For pets who seem depressed and or aggressive. Said to control anger. Aids in communication. Also used for protection.
Aids in respiratory issues, neck problems, vocal chords and thyroid gland.

Brown Snowflake Jasper – A brown stone with flecks of white. Nurturing and grounding stone. Supports inner strength and tranquility during times of stress, illness or danger.  Helps alleviate fears. Used for chronically ill pets

Blue Chalcedony – A calming shade of blue or green. Calming and negates negative energy. Brings out the inner child and playfulness. Aids in communication between pets and their guardians. Great for sad or depressed animals.

Labradorite – A magical blue grey stone with flecks of various colors. Healing stone that helps promote self-worth, strength and communication. Helps one develop a sense of humor. Great stone for guard or guide dogs who work all day and need to play more.





 Our line of Healing Pet Amulets can be found at:
Sacred Circle in Old Town, Alexandria VA  on King Street
New England Dog Biscuit in the Essex Street Mall, Salem MA and online: https://practicalmagicsalem.com/healing-pet-amulets


Copyright @ 2017 jeanie mossa  four paws acupuncture Salem MA








Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Can Acupuncture Treat Serious Dog Agility Injuries?






Can Acupuncture Treat Serious Dog Agility Injuries?
 YES!
Serious injuries such as fractures, dislocations, torn tendons, and serious internal injuries should be first treated by a veterinarian.
Recovery from many of these injuries, however, can be augmented by acupuncture, herbs and nutrition.
Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese Medicine can also help reduce the pain and symptoms of post-operative surgery, arthritis, neurological issues, hip and elbow dysplasia, knee and shoulder injuries and pain. Most dog patients have improved performance in their agility after a series of acupuncture sessions.

Prevention of Sports & Agility Injuries
Chinese medicine has many tools to help prevent injuries and the recurrence of injuries. Through acupuncture, nutrition, herbal support, and proper preparation and training, injuries can be minimized or avoided. Oriental medicine is also helpful in treating old injuries that sideline your dog’s play in later years. Regular treatment helps your dog’s body stay in balance. A body in balance is less susceptible to injury and illness.
Oriental medicine approaches health in a holistic manner. In the Chinese medical framework, the body is seen as an energetic collection of functions, in contrast to the Western view of the body as a mechanical collection of parts.

To learn more about veterinary acupuncture and traditional Chinese Medicine on the North Shore of MA please visit the Four Paws Acupuncture site. http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com




Saturday, January 25, 2020

Happy Chinese New Year of the Rat


Wishing all a very Happy Chinese New Year of the Rat!
Gung Hay Fat Choy

from all of us at Four Paws Acupuncture 

Veterinary Acupuncture & Traditional Chinese Medicine
House-calls in Salem MA, Beverly MA & Marblehead MA

Office appointments available at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA


Keeping tails wagging on the North Shore of MA!

Thursday, January 23, 2020

Veterinary Acupuncture House Call Guidelines



House Call Guidelines

During my many years of making house calls I have found that a few guidelines were needed to make your pet’s session relaxing and for it to receive the most benefits from the treatment. Working with animals takes a bit more focus and energy. As I incorporate many modalities of holistic therapies into this session, I also need to stay calm and focused.

Thank you for helping me make each session for your pet the best that it can possibly be. Please note everyone receives this email before their first session.

Pick a room or area that your dog/cat is most comfortable. If they have a favorite blanket or toy keep it handy. Please take your dog out to pee before I arrive if necessary.

The owner must be in the room with me and the dog/cat during the entire session. You are part of your dog/cat’s family. This keeps the dog/cat relaxed. I also ask the owner to participate to help keep the dog/cat still during the session. Keeping the owner involved makes the animal happy and usually better behaved. During the session, I will also be showing you how to massage, do basic acupressure and apply liniments.
Please note this is also for liability reasons.

Please turn off all TV, radio, video games or music unless it is classical soothing music.

Please no cell phone, texting during the session unless it is an emergency.

Please! No cooking, doing homework, or any other activities that will require you to get up and down and leave the room.

Children may watch but must be quiet and respect the dog/cat and me.

No Smoking in the room.

To learn more about veterinary acupuncture & traditional Chinese Medicine for dogs and cats on the North Shore of MA please visit the Four Paws Acupuncture website. http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com

Jeanie Mossa MS L.Ac. is now accepting new dog patients at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA.  Please contact us directly to schedule a session. http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com/contact.html



Saturday, January 18, 2020

Post Surgery Acupuncture for Pets


Post-Op Surgery
Acupuncture can help your pet's recovery!

There are many benefits of using acupuncture after surgery, all which aid in helping your pet heal faster, reduce pain and it may even help cut its recovery time in half.
Clinical studies have shown that acupuncture treatments before and after surgery significantly reduced pain and the use of painkillers.
Acupuncture has been proven to:
·        Reduce pain and inflammation
·        Promote circulation
·        Release endorphins
·        Boost the immune system
·        Minimize drug side-effects
·        Decrease stress
·        Reduce scarring


For post-surgical patients at Our Family Veterinary Services all sessions include a combination of acupuncture, laser therapy and acupressure for maximum benefits. http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com/services.html
In conjunction with acupuncture, there are also a few excellent Chinese herbal formulas, liniments and homeopathic remedies that reduce pain and inflammation while speeding up the healing process.
To learn more how acupuncture and traditional Chinese Medicine can help your pet before or after surgery or to schedule a session with licensed acupuncturist Jeanie Mossa MS. L.Ac. at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody please visit the Four Paws Acupuncture website.




Monday, January 13, 2020

Cinnamon for Dogs






Cinnamon aka Rou Gui
  has been used in Traditional Chinese Medicine as a warming herb for the channels and joints. Used for arthritic symptoms in knees, elbows, hips and back that are made worse during cold damp winter days.


Cinnamon Meatballs for Dogs

Here is a meatball recipe for your dog with warming cinnamon for those dogs affected by cold damp winter days. 

NOTE: Please do not add onion to this recipe as onion is toxic for dogs. 

Cinnamon Meatballs for Dogs

  • 1/2 pound of free range/organic ground chicken or turkey
  • 1/4 cup of shredded carrots (optional)
  • 3 tablespoons of fresh or dried parsley (great for dog breath) 
  • 1 teaspoon of salt 
  • 1/8 cup of Parmesan cheese 
  • 1 egg (leave out if the dog is allergic to chicken.) 
  • 1 tablespoon of cinnamon 
This can be made for people too!

I am trained in traditional Chinese medicine which includes herbal medicine, acupuncture, acupressure, nutrition and lifestyle changes. Combined these therapies can make a difference in your pet's health. (And yours too!)

To learn more about veterinary acupuncture & holistic medicine on the
 North Shore of MA please visit the Four Paws Acupuncture site: http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com




Want to learn more about nutrition and herbal remedies for your dog? Check out our online class for dog lovers.



 https://www.udemy.com/course/holistic-dog-treating-k9-pain-stress-ailments-naturally

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Veterinary Acupuncture for Senior Citizen Dogs!


Most of my dog patients are senior citizens that suffer from arthritis, back, hip and knee pain, shoulder and elbow pain and have mobility issues.

Acupuncture combined with herbal medicine and proper nutrition can help ease pain and aid in mobility issues.

Learn more about our services at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA and House-calls on the North Shore of MA at 
http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com

Our Happy Dogs page features several dogs who have benefited from acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine.  http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com/happydogs.html

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Learn more about holistic medicine & acupuncture at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA




Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA is now offering veterinary acupuncture & traditional Chinese Medicine for dogs & cats. To learn more about what is included in every acupuncture session for your pet please click on the video link above.

Please note that all sessions include whatever therapies are need for your pet's specific diagnosis. I do not charge extra for laser, acupressure, herbal recommendations, etc. Usually the first session takes about 1.5 hours and follow up sessions are about 45 minutes to an hour depending on the animal.

All owners must be in the room the entire time of the session. I ask that all cell phones are turned off too. 

To learn more about veterinary acupuncture and holistic medicine for pets on the North Shore of MA please visit http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com

Monday, January 6, 2020

Back in the Saddle Again!

Veterinary Acupuncture 

& Traditional Chinese Medicine 

for Pets on the North Shore of MA!


The holiday is over and Four Paws Acupuncture is open! It was a lovely staycation. So nice to spend time with loved ones and the fur-kids. However it is time to go back to work.


Quan Yin Kali Wu rolling on Winter Island's Waikiki Beach on Christmas

I am now accepting new dog and cat patients at Our Family Veterinary Services in Peabody MA. I also make house-calls on the North Shore of MA. Please note that my travel range is limited and there may be a waiting list for some weeks.




Treatment Techniques:
      Veterinary Acupuncture
  • Acupressure, Tui Na
    Massage
  • Laser Therapy
  • Magnet Therapy
  • Qi Gong
  • Chinese Herbology
  • Homeopathic Medicine
  • Animal Nutrition
  • Animal Reiki
  • Moxabustion

Some Conditions Treated


  • Hip and Elbow Dysplasia
  • Stress/Anxiety
  • Movement Disorders
  • Pain Management
  • Low Back Pain
  • Arthritis
  • Allergies
  • Asthma
  • Low Energy
  • Spinal Cord Injuries
  • Shoulder & Elbow
    Injuries
  • Ligament & Tendon
    Injuries
  • Recovery from
    Fractures
  • Degenerative Myelopathy
  • Muscle Strains
  • Off Season Agility Conditioning
  • And so much more!
New Patients: To schedule a house-call or an appointment at Our Family Veterinary Services please fill out our Contact Us form: http://www.fourpawsacupuncture.com/contact.html

Please include as much information as possible about your dog or cat. I will respond via email within 24 hours of receiving your contact form during regular business hours.

Wednesday, January 1, 2020

Happy New Year!


Wishing you and your loved ones a very
 Happy New Year and Decade from all of us at 

We will be closed through January 5th. If this is a medical emergency please contact your veterinarian.

Canine Acupressure to Calm the Mind, Reduce Stress & Anxiety

  A sneak peak from our online class Basic K9 Acupressure for Dog Owners. https://www.udemy.com/course/basic-canine-acupressure-for-dog-owners